The Front Page

Newsletter of
Korea-Cold War Families of the Missing


August 2004 Issue #4

2004 FAMILY UPDATE LOCATIONS 2005

City selections are based on past update schedules and demographic mapping of family members' home locations.

2004 : September 25 Hartford, CT
October 23 Portland, OR
November 20 Orlando, FL
2005 : January 22, 2005 Reno , NV
February 26, 2005 San Antonio , TX
March 19, 2005 Memphis , TN
May 13-14, 2005 Washington , DC*
July 30, 2005 Omaha , NE
August 27, 2005 Columbus , OH
September 24, 2005 San Diego , CA
September 26-28, 2005 San Diego , CA
October 22, 2005 Raleigh , NC
November 19, 2005 Spokane , WA
* - The Korean and Cold War Annual Government Briefings




NATIONAL POW-MIA RECOGNITION DAY :: TUESDAY, September 14th, 2004 The 2004 date was moved to TUESDAY out of respect for Rosh Hashanah.




Secretary's Corner by Emma Skuybida:
We wish to welcome the new members who joined us at the Washington DC family outreach.

IF YOU HAVE ATTENDED ANY FAMILY OUTREACH IN 2003 AND 2004 BESIDES THE Washington DC, PLEASE CONTACT IRENE MANDRA AT imandra@optonline.net OR WRITE TO Korea/Cold War Families, PO Box 454, Farmingdale NY 11735.

If you wish to write a story about your missing loved one for the HEROES column in our newsletter, please do so and e-mail our web master at info@koreacoldwar.org If you have a picture, please include it.

In addition, any submission will be added to our online Heroes section. It may be found at: http://www.koreacoldwar.org/bios/heroes.html The stories and pictures are permanently placed.




Contact your Congressional Rep through the U.S. Capitol Switchboard - 1-202-224-3121 or House Cloak Room at 1-202-225-7350 (R) and 1-202-225-7330 (D).

Congressional Contacts:
http://congress.org/congressorg/home/
Congressional Email Directory: http://www.webslingerz.com/jhoffman/congress-email.html
House of Representatives, 108th Congress:
http://www.house.gov/




Board of Directors and Staff:
National Chair - Irene Mandra, Family Member
Vice-Chair - Joe McNulty, Family Member
Treasurer - Gail Stallone, Family Member
Secretary - Emma Skuybida, Family Advocate
Membership Chair - LuAnn Nelson, Family Member
Research - Daniel J. Pitts, Family Advocate
Cold War Advocate - Charlotte Mitnik, Family Member
Korean War Historian - Irwin Braun, Korean War Veteran
Newsletter Editor - Ki Ceniglio, news@koreacoldwar.org
Website Questions,
Problems and Links:webmaster@koreacoldwar.org
Web Site: www.koreacoldwar.org




NEWS & VIEWS by Joe McNulty
SPEECH GIVEN AT DOD PERSONNEL ACCOUNTING CONFERENCE, May 18-20,2004


Convening of this conference and the invitation to attend offer a welcomed opportunity to address some noteworthy problems and respond to issues that continue to haunt us. Since I became actively involved in the early 90s with a family association seeking a full accounting of Korea War POW/MIA, I have seen the steady growth of DPMOs efforts and the participation of many more families in the search for the missing. Increased appropriations now mean that not only would the search for the missing include Korea, the Cold War, and Vietnam but also World War 11. The intensity of the recent effort has led to the recovery of remains from a World War 11 crash site in Tibet and on the Kamchatka peninsula. The size of forensic teams has grown and the scope of their activity has expanded to the far corners of the globe.

As a family member, I cannot but appreciate the dedication of the military and civilian personnel who often risk life and limb to achieve their goals. One only has to listen to presentations at DPMOs annual family briefings to recognize the level of their expertise.

I know all do not share these attitudes and I know why. Over the years the government has been less than candid about accounting for the missing from Korea and Vietnam. A legacy of this policy restricts family access to vital information and engenders the distrust many feel. The failure to declassify documents that have lost their unique status and the lack of cooperation of organizations like the CIA encourage this attitude. National security if often cited for maintaining the restrictive classifications. While the volume of paper is a factor, the availability of documents even when required by law-is deliberately inhibited, and FOIA is needed for access. In other instances the protection of individuals responsible for policy is offered as a reason. Yet the feeling persists that much of the information could be released and no one would be harmed. It seems that the phrase the highest priority doesnt always ring true.

When family members and veterans express a strong belief in the survival of live Americans in North Korea, China, and Russia, the argument is hard to ignore. As we know the Gulag Papers acknowledged the presence of American POWs in Russian prison camps. Speculation suggests some could still be alive. My dilemma is I want to believe these arguments but also want to see concrete evidence.

The difficulty of reconciling the conflicting opinions increases when the full accounting initiative is examined. Why isnt greater leverage being applied to China to open its archives and supply the documentation needed to track the missing? Are economic and political considerations still given greater weight in the dialogue about the men who were held back? Does the desire for better relations prevent us from giving top priority to the POW/MIA issue? Is certification of proposed treaties withheld from those countries that dont cooperate?

Other areas of exploration include the names given to the Chinese for which they have yet to respond. What did we learn from the interview of four Chinese veterans of the Korean War who helped to run the prison camps? The debriefs of South Korean POWs who escapee from the North in recent years should be fertile ground for information. Yet insight into the scope of interviews with these men is denied.

Surely they would have seen American POWs if they were alive or could identify those who died. Are we pursuing KIA/BNR cases in the DMZ with South Korea? Is it possible to access the North Korean archives?

In its work in Russia, the USRJC has sought the files of the KGB and GRU that relate to American POWs taken to the Soviet Union. Disclosure of finding in psychiatric, penal and other facilities held by these intelligence agencies would be of value. Recognizing the frustration commission members must feel in attempts to get data, we must support their continued requests. Little has been said about the Russia Memoirs since the early revelations. The USRJC extended its reach to the archives in the Ukraine, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia. The release of Dr. Paul Cole research project in these areas is also needed.

Consideration should be given to family members who could volunteer time and effort to support DPMOs many activities. The extraordinary workload generated by tons of records at the National Archives, presidential libraries and resources in Europe suggests additional personnel could be used. If lay persons can work at the White House and Walter Reed Hospital. Why not at DPMO or the National Archives. Assuming clearance is given, a schedule could be devised that would lessen the burden of others. Under the guidance of professionals, an individual could research designated areas. Records could be identified and prepared for review. Instead of a family member taking a stab at a set of documents and hoping to find something, a logical sequence of needed work could be assigned.

Although communication between families and DPMO is cordial, improvement might include a more generous release of news not found in the media or from e-mail. The DPMO website contains a page for the latest news and reports, yet the last entry for News updates is 2001, Past Significant Events 2002, and Past Special reports 2002. The listing of individuals assigned to DPMO and their responsibilities would also help.

The publication of names of POW/MIAs in newspapers in the search for family members by Project Outreach is invaluable. The veterans column in my sate newspaper listed such a release, and I immediately recognized a Cold War loss. A brother was notified of the need to call DPMO and provide a blood sample.

Finally it is time to reconsider membership for family members on the USRJC. A request was made in recent years and rejected. A compromise at that time provided for representatives of family organizations to attend periodic meetings. Is it still possible? Such an appointment would not only include the families but also supply the input and motivation that comes from a loss in war. In recent years DPMO teams for the recovery of remains in North Korea have included veterans and representatives of family associations. Would DPMO consider assigning a member of the Korea/cold War Families of the Missing to a future visit?

Thank you for the opportunity to speak this afternoon.

Joe McNulty, Vice President
Korea-Cold War Families of the Missing




DPMO Family Support and Casualty Liaison:
http://131.84.1.34/dpmo/family/index.htm





IN MY OPINION
BY IRENE L. MANDRA
The Price of Abandonment


Is life so dear, or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God Patrick Henry 1775

My Dear Members,
Those words represent exactly what our government did Fifty-One years ago when they would rather not confront North Korea, China, and the former Soviet Union. They sacrificed our loved ones... our Fathers, Brothers, Cousins, Uncles, and Friends to a life of chains and slavery in order to purchase peace. Why not refuse to blockade. Why not refuse aide, Why not refuse to trade. Why not refuse humanitarian aide. Why does a small country like Japan care enough about their citizens to stand up to North Korea, and demand their people be freed and sent back to their country. Where is the United States in all this?

I have heard every excuse possible. Why doesnt the WHITE HOUSE pick up the phone and call China and demand to know, "what did you do with our servicemen?" Where is the call to Russia? Would not a parent whose child has been kidnapped, not demand for their child to be released, would not the parent do everything in their power to bring that child home?

Is not the President, the Father of our country? I am not blaming this administration, it has gone on for 51 years, with the White House knowing yet doing nothing.

Tell me then when we are in another major war, do you think the citizens of our great country will be willing to send their sons and daughters in harms' way, knowing that if they are captured the government they are fighting for will not fight to get them back? I am going to send this newsletter to the White House, with the hope that someone there will read this column and they will know how dissatisfied the families of the Missing are with the "progress" that has been made. The Department of Defense needs more personnel, to handle concerns of the families. Please dont tell me we dont have the money, stop your entire Foreign Aide and spend the money on US citizens who are paying the taxes to take care of Americans. It seems the more money we give away, more countries hate us. I am going to include testimony given at the Senate Select Committee Hearing November 10, 1992 by Steve E. Kiba, a US Ex-POW captured January 12, 1953 and held by the Red Chinese two years AFTER the Korean war was over. Please read his book The Flag.




Recent News - We are always optimistic when we hear that remains have been recovered and may lead to an identification. Current reports of remains recoveries and possible easier access mean that our government has a lot of work to do, and we hope they will pursue each and every opportunity with renewed vigor. We also look forward to DPMO's Jerry Jennings' questioning of US Defector Charles Robert Jenkins regarding American POWs who have been reported to be alive in Communist captivity for decades. We are mindful of Jenkins' legal position and the possibility it may complicate if not corrupt any meaningful discussion on American POWs. We need to know, we have a right to know, what Jenkins has to say and what he may have seen.




Excerpts from Steve E. Kiba Testimony before the Senate Select Committee:
Im appearing before you - before the Committee. I say you, now, because almost all the Committee-well, except for you, (Senator Smith) is gone. It is intimidating being cut off from your world, being isolated, and being force to stand 18 to 24 hours a day in from to Red Chinese interrogators with a Red Chinese Guard holding a machine pistol to your temple, caressing your temple.

Now, that was intimidating. They were sadistic and barbaric. They put me on a starvation diet, they withheld my water. I would go days and days and days without a drink of water. I would go days and even weeks without a bite of food. They threaten not to send me home, they threatened to keep me for life. They kept some of my friends for life. There are still there. In my testimony Im going to tell you about American POWs who were abandoned after the 1953 cease-fire, and I know what Im talking about, because I was left over there after the 1953 cease-fire.




NEWS - U.S. hopes to ask Jenkins about other Americans in N. Korea
Saturday July 31, 2004
A senior U.S. official in charge of American soldiers classified as missing in action said Saturday he hoped to question alleged U.S. Army deserter Charles Jenkins about other Americans in North Korea.
Kyodo News




DPMO Korean War Resources:
http://131.84.1.34/dpmo/pmkor/index.htm





NEWS - N.C. Woman Learns that Brother's Remains Found in China
By ALLISON PERKINS - Associated Press July 23, 2004
MADISON, N.C. (AP) - "Hello, Norman." Betty Kirzinger has waited 52 years to say that. And when U.S. officials told her last week that a search team had found not only pieces of a plane, but also human remains at the site in northeast China where her brother's plane crashed 52 years ago, that was the first thing she said.




NEWS - KW Remains Returned Over DMZ
27 July, 2004
Remains believed to be those of a U.S. soldier missing in action from the Korean War have been recovered by a U.S. team, and returned overland from North Korea across the demilitarized zone, as was done in late May for the first recovery operation of 2004, and were repatriated at Yongsan military compound in Seoul on July 1.

A joint team operating near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea recovered the remains, believed to be those of a U.S. Army soldier from the 7th Infantry Division who fought against Chinese forces in November or December of 1950. Approximately 1,000 Americans are estimated to have been lost in battles of the Chosin campaign.

The 28-person U.S. recovery team was composed of specialists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, where the remains were flown to begin the forensic identification process.

Since 1996, 29 joint operations have been conducted in North Korea, in which remains believed to be those of more than 200 U.S. soldiers have been recovered. Of the 88,000 U.S. service members missing in action from all conflicts, more than 8,100 are from the Korean War.




NEWS - One of the 14 "official" Cold War loss incidents the USG will admit to. 2 KIA, 29 MIA.
A NEW LESSON IN THE LIMITS OF POWER - TIME
The Weekly Magazine, April 25, 1969 Vol. 93, No. 17
The weak can be rash. The powerful must be restrained.

So said William Rogers last week after North Korean MIGs shot down a NAVY EC-121 reconnaissance plane. The Secretary of State's observation was precisely to the point.




NEWS - Military ID's Remains of Soldier Missing for 54 Years
The Associated Press - The Fayetteville Observer
The family of Edmund "Teddy" Lilly III had known for a while that he died in fierce fighting 54 years ago during the early days of the Korean War, but they never got a chance to welcome home his body.




United States Department of Defense
News Release No. 739-04
August 3, 2004


Remains of American MIAs Found in North Korea

Remains believed to be those of two American soldiers missing in action from the Korean War have been recovered in North Korea by a U.S. team and will be repatriated at Yongsan Military Compound in Seoul on Aug. 5.

The joint remains recovery work is the result of negotiations with North Korea led by Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for POW/Missing Personnel Affairs Jerry D. Jennings. The remains will be returned over land from North Korea across the demilitarized zone as was done in May and July for the first two recovery operations of 2004.

A joint team operating near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea recovered the remains believed to be those of a U.S. Army soldier from the 7th Infantry Division who fought against Chinese forces November-December 1950. Approximately 1,000 Americans are estimated to have been lost in battles of the Chosin campaign.

Additionally, a second team recovered remains in Unsan County, about 60 miles north of Pyongyang. This area was the site of battles between communist forces and the U.S. Armys 1st Cavalry and 25th Infantry divisions in November 1950.

The 28-person U.S. contingent was composed of specialists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, where the remains will be flown to begin the forensic identification process.

Since 1996, 30 joint operations have been conducted in North Korea, during which more than 200 remains believed to be those of U.S. soldiers have been recovered. Of the 88,000 U.S. service members missing in action from all conflicts, more than 8,100 are from the Korean War.

For additional information about POW/MIA recoveries, visit http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo, or call the Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office at (703) 699-1169.




We welcome your comments, questions and thoughts.

Korea-Cold War Families of the Missing, Inc.
PO Box 454, Farmingdale, NY 11735 USA
info@koreacoldwar.org





NEWS - Seoul Searcher - Bring Them Home
by Cho Se-hyon
Quite a few South Koreans were impressed once again by the press report last Thursday that the remains of 19 U.S. soldiers killed in the Korean War were recovered in North Korea during a recent joint U.S.-North Korean recovery operation. The remains were brought to the South to be honored in a ceremony at a U.S. base here before being sent to Hawaii for identification testing, the report said.

"There is a paragraph that I read from time to time when I lose focus. 'War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. The decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth war is much worse. The person who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing which is more important than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature and has no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself' - John S. Mill. Now, there is a little Marine Corps bravado in there, but I do believe in the basic premise."

Excerpt from a letter home by USMC CAPT Ryan Beaupre - Who was Killed in Action on March 21st, 2003 in a helicopter crash during Operation Iraqi Freedom




One of Our Heroes CAPT Jimmy P. Robinson, USAF MIA
November 1, 1952
Operation Ivy, Enewetak, Marshall Islands
by Andi Wolos, AII POW-MIA


Jimmy Robinson was a Pilot... and a Husband, a Father, an Officer and a Gentleman, an Ex-POW and then one day he went missing.

The case of Captain Jimmy Priestly Robinson is a unique one. A brave, wonderful man, Robinson was lost during the first H-bomb test, known as Operation Ivy, Mike Shot. The case is unique because Jimmy Robinson has never been accounted-for, even though his loss incident was witnessed. His remains have never been recovered, even though the USG knew exactly where he was lost. His family has received no answers, no effects, nothing, even though he was lost during one of the most witnessed, watched and studied events in our nation's history. No agency, neither DPMO nor the USAF, the White House, or any other USG entity considers itself responsible with respect to providing the family with answers. Jimmy Robinson is simply "lost"... lost to time, lost to National Security and, most sadly, lost to official "bureaucracy."

On November 1st, 1952, the first H-Bomb test, code-named Operation IVY, Mike Shot, was scheduled for detonation off the tiny atoll of Enewetak (Eniwetok), Marshall Islands. IVY was an atmospheric nuclear weapons test series held in the Atomic Energy Commission's (AEC) Pacific Proving Ground. Joint Task Force 132 (JTF 132) was the organization that conducted the IVY test series. Elements of the four services, the AEC and other Federal government agencies, and civilians from government laboratory organizations and contractors made up this organization. 9,000 people were in the vicinity of Enewetak that day, Jimmy Robinson was part of TG 132.4.

Robinson, an accomplished and war-tested pilot, was assigned to fly an F-84G-5 Cloud Sampler that day. His mission? To fly through the enormous mushroom cloud created by the H-Bomb detonation.

"The Shot, as witnessed aboard the various vessels at sea, is not easily described. Accompanied by a brilliant light, the heat wave was felt immediately at distances of thirty to thirty-five miles. The tremendous fireball, appearing on the horizon like the sun when half-risen, quickly expanded after a momentary hover time and appeared to be approximately a mile in diameter before the cloud-chamber effect and scud clouds partially obscured it from view. A very large cloud- chamber effect was visible shortly after the detonation and a tremendous conventional mushroom-shaped cloud soon appeared, seemingly balanced on a wide, dirty stem.

Apparently, the dirty stem was due to the coral particles, debris, and water which were sucked high into the air. Around the base of the stem, there appeared to be a curtain of water which soon dropped back around the area where the island of Elugelab [Eluklab] had been."

Robinson, flying Pebble Red Four, flew through the massive cloud, collecting air samples for study. During the mission, Robinson encountered some instability and problems with his navigation equipment but was able to recover. He ran low on fuel and was instructed to fly back to Enewetak. Robinson was in radio contact and reported the atoll in sight, and shortly afterwards reported he could not make the airstrip and would bail out. A support/SAR helicopter was trailing Robinson and his last transmission confirms "I have the helicopter in sight and am bailing out."

According to the official Operation Ivy After Action Report, "The helicopter pilot observed the F-84G drop its wing tanks and possibly eject the cockpit canopy also. Red 4 then flew into the water in a level glide, seeming to be under positive control. The helicopter arrived over the sinking plane from the approach or west end of Enewetak Island) about 1 minute after it hit the water, at about 1030. The F-84G had flipped over when it hit. The pilot was never found."

The family of Jimmy Robinson knows what happened that day... but the USG has stonewalled them every inch of the way for over 50 years in their search for his remains and answers.

From November 1st through the 3rd, Jimmy Robinson was Missing. Then he was a confirmed casualty, killed in action. The Atomic testing program continued with Operation Castle, Redwing, King and others. Tens of thousands of veterans who served in the Pacific Proving Ground were polluted and poisoned... and Jimmy Robinson remained missing.

Eventually the USG, having completed their Atomic testing program and having completely laid waste to the Marshall Islands, was tasked with cleaning up the mess. This included removal of sunken craft and buildings, biological clean-up, and an endless housekeeping list to make the islands "inhabitable" before turning them back to the control of the Marshallese people.

Was Jimmy Robsinon's craft ever recovered... either after the loss or years later when the USG was cleaning up its mess? The family was told that divers did investigate the wreckage. Were Robinson's remains ever recovered? Clearly the fact that he was the first Atomic loss made him a valuable asset to the various Atomic Agencies, scientists and physicists. As he had flown directly into the cloud, and other Pebble Red members were known to have had exposure, recovering Jimmy Robinson should have been a priority.

No one was saying. National Security precluded any answers. It took 50 years for the USG to finally allow the family to even have a Memorial Service at Arlington and present his widow with a flag. But that was the limit of what the USG would give the family.

Today, the family is between a rock and a hard place. His daughter, Rebecca "Becky" Miller, a tireless, wonderful lady who works for Atomic Veterans is told he is not a Cold War case... DPMO will not help, it is not their problem. The USAF considers his a training casualty. The DOE - Department of Energy - has classified everything. Jimmy P. Robinson remains lost because, according to his government, there was no hostile action, there was no enemy.

In reality, Jimmy Robinson remains lost because his own government, one he served so honorably, was wounded for, fought war for, was captured for, has chosen to abandon him.




United States Department of Defense
News Release No. 608-04
IMMEDIATE RELEASE June 25, 2004


Remains of American MIA Found in North Korea

Remains believed to be those of an American soldier missing in action from the Korean War have been recovered by a U.S. team and will be repatriated at Yongsan Military Compound in Seoul on July 1.

The joint remains recovery work is the result of negotiations with North Korea led by Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for POW/Missing Personnel Affairs, Jerry D. Jennings. The remains will be returned overland from North Korea across the demilitarized zone as was done in late May for the first recovery operation of 2004.

A joint team operating near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea recovered the remains believed to be those of a U.S. Army soldier from the 7th Infantry Division who fought against Chinese forces November-December 1950. Approximately 1,000 Americans are estimated to have been lost in battles of the Chosin campaign.

The 28-person U.S. contingent was composed of specialists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, where the remains will be flown to begin the forensic identification process.

Since 1996, 29 joint operations have been conducted in North Korea, during which more than 200 remains believed to be those of U.S. soldiers have been recovered. Of the 88,000 U.S. service members missing in action from all conflicts, more than 8,100 are from the Korean War.




NEWS - Remains of Korean War-era GI recovered
By Jeremy Kirk, Stars and Stripes July 3, 2004
YONGSAN GARRISON, South Korea - After a 30-day mission in North Korea, a recovery team brought back what's believed to be the remains of a U.S. soldier from a hilly area where pitched battles were fought during the Korean War.




THE BEGINNING
Written by Maj. Paul Sanders, Sgt. Gorden Greene and PFC Frank Gross


When sunlight warms the statue, casting shadows to the ground
Can it cast the frozen fury, that these gallant men once found
See the courage in their faces, see the pride which understood
Their faith in one another, that forged a chain of brotherhood

In bronze and granite marble, see how strong how proud they stand
In their honor and their glory, with a brotherhood of man
The ones who died at Chosin, did not give their lives in vain
God took them from that frozen hell, and blessed them in His name

Men who died in all the battles, from Pusan to Pork Chop Hill
Call from the grave, remember us, as this statue says we will
Our missing brothers call us, from some prison grim and drear
Remember our misfortune, we answer, never fear

Their cause is not forgotten, for we surviving mortal men
Place this wreath and pray a prayer, that the sword wont rise again
When moonlight paints the statue, with a gleaming silver beam
Will the spirits of the ones who died, enhance this noble scene

We ask our God for guidance, as we stand in silent prayer
Our tears say that we miss them, as this statue says we care
So blow the bugle softly, let its lonely echo sound
Let the music and our memories, dedicate this hallowed ground




United States Department of Defense
News Release No. 739-04
August 3, 2004


Remains of American MIAs Found in North Korea

Remains believed to be those of two American soldiers missing in action from the Korean War have been recovered in North Korea by a U.S. team and will be repatriated at Yongsan Military Compound in Seoul on Aug. 5.

The joint remains recovery work is the result of negotiations with North Korea led by Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for POW/Missing Personnel Affairs Jerry D. Jennings. The remains will be returned over land from North Korea across the demilitarized zone as was done in May and July for the first two recovery operations of 2004.

A joint team operating near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea recovered the remains believed to be those of a U.S. Army soldier from the 7th Infantry Division who fought against Chinese forces November-December 1950. Approximately 1,000 Americans are estimated to have been lost in battles of the Chosin campaign.

Additionally, a second team recovered remains in Unsan County, about 60 miles north of Pyongyang. This area was the site of battles between communist forces and the U.S. Armys 1st Cavalry and 25th Infantry divisions in November 1950.

The 28-person U.S. contingent was composed of specialists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, where the remains will be flown to begin the forensic identification process.

Since 1996, 30 joint operations have been conducted in North Korea, during which more than 200 remains believed to be those of U.S. soldiers have been recovered. Of the 88,000 U.S. service members missing in action from all conflicts, more than 8,100 are from the Korean War.




On the WEB:
THE KOREAN WAR EDUCATOR : A MUST SEE SITE!
http://www.koreanwar-educator.org/
Comprehensive archive project covering every topic imaginable: POW-MIA, Units, Histories, Campaigns, Materiels, Images, Letters, Personal Experiences, Facts, Figures and more.

Korea WebWeekly
http://www.kimsoft.com/korea.htm
An independent, non-partisan, non-profit web on all things Korean: Her history, culture, economy, politics and military - since 1995.




NEWS - Korean War MIA Returned to Family After 50 Years
FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. -- The Army is delivering on a 50-year-old promise to bring home the remains of a soldier who died during the Korean War to his family in North Carolina.
AP




Treasurer's Report: by Gail Stallone
On behalf of Korea/Cold War Families I wish to thank The following Organizations & Business for your thoughtful and generous donations.
American Legion
Korean War Veterans
Vietnam Veterans
Doctor Todd
Physical Therapy of Farmingdale
Moby Drug Store
and our Anonymous Friends

Please remember we are not only a tax-free organization, but we are also considered a charity, thus all donations are tax deductible.




Korea-Cold War Families of the Missing
1st Year Anniversary by Irene Mandra


This August, we will be observing our first anniversary. The year has flown by and so very much has happened.

Let me begin by assuring you that people, who have been in this issue over twenty years, thirty years, thirty five years, are the leadership, heart and soul of this organization. As a result, in one year much has been done.

Numerous functions, events, vigils, hearings, symposiums were on our schedule. Washington, DC was a frequent stop for us;

April 12-15 - US-Russian Archival Conference held in conjunction with NARA. As we reported earlier, the Conference was excellent and provided an in-depth review of policy, performance, cases and future plans.

April 30-May 1 - Annual Family Outreach with DPMO. Too much to do, too little time... the case load we brought with us to DC was a heavy one and we were very pleased DPMO and Casualty were so responsive in answering questions we asked for our members on their cases.

May 18-20 - DOD Personnel Accounting Conference. VP Joe McNulty took on the task of attending this 3 day conference. One of the key aspects of this event was the input of family members and organizations on how DPMO may better serve the families in the future.




Around the Country:
May 30 - Irene Mandra was the featured guest on POW-MIA Freedom Radio. This was her 4th appearance on the show. Rod Utech and all the other good folks at the program have broadcast a 3 hour POW-MIA dedicated radio show every Sunday for years. The broadcast is heard nationally as well as broadcast live over the internet. We will be appearing again in the near future.

Irene Mandra and other Korea-Cold War Families of the Missing staff and Officers were keynote speakers at numerous vigils and events over the year. Included are: National POW-MIA Recognition Day, Nassau County, NY with thousands of attendees.

April 24 - Irene Mandra was keynote speaker for the VFW Tribute to POW-MIAs

We have regularly published our Newsletter and are very pleased with the wonderful response we have received. Our website is growing weekly as is our membership. Thank you to all who have made such an enormous effort to make Korea-Cold War Families such a great organization.

We were honored by numerous awards from :
Central L.I. Chapter of the Korean War Veterans, Korean American Students, and 54-year Ceremony of the Start of the Korean War, among others.

One of the most important and interesting challenges we have taken on is the case of Captain Jimmy P. Robinson, USAF, MIA November 1, 1952.

As you may have read in this issue, the Robinson case is an extremely difficult one and painful for his family. They have endured so much in their search for answers. Our Research Veteran, Dan Pitts, has devoted his days and nights trying to track down the various agencies and reports that might shed some light on this loss. We have all worked on this case, and we are far from finished. Over the year we have been in contact with DPMO, the USAF, DoD, DoE, the Marshall Islands, National Archives and numerous other people and places. Our webmaster, was able to track down and collect what eventually amounted to 4 full CDs (3 gigs!) of documents, reports and records detailing the events leading up to, including and after the loss incident. We are after the truth.




NEWS - Korean Vet Identified by DNA Buried in Home County - Associated Press
CARLISLE, Ky. - Army Cpl. Charles Anderson Williams received a military burial more than five decades after he died during fighting in the Korean War.




JACK IS MISSING!
Three words I shall never forget
by Patricia Lively Dickinson


On a beautiful fall day in November, 1951, as I was walking home from school, I noticed my dad standing on the back porch with one foot propped up on the porch railing, his elbow braced on his knee, his hand holding his bowed head.

Instinctively, I knew something was wrong. I ran the rest of the way home and racing up the steps, I asked, "what's wrong?" My dad lifted his head and with tears streaming down his face, he said three words: "Jack is missing!"

THE TELEGRAM

"I regret to inform you that a report just received states that your son Jack Lively Aviation machinist mate third class US Navy is missing as of 6 November 1951 when the plane on which he was a crew member was reported overdue and is presumed to have crashed at sea. All available research are now engaged in locating your son. Your great anxiety is understood and when further reports are received you will be informed immediately."

Vice Admiral L T Dubose Chief Naval, Personel, 1036 am.

THE CREWMEN
LTJG Judd Hodgson, Pilot
AT1 Erwin D. Raglin, Radioman
LTJG Sam Rosenfeld, Co-Pilot
AL2 Paul G. Juric, Electronic Tech
ENS Donald A. Smith, Navigator
AT2 William S. Meyer, Radioman
AO1 Reuben S. Baggett, Ordnance
AL2 Ralph A. Wigert, Jr., Electronic Tech
AD1 Paul R. Foster, Captain - Mechanic
AD3 Jack Lively, Mechanic

My brother, Jack Lively, joined the U.S. Navy on April 18, 1950, one week shy of his nineteenth birthday. He did so, quite likely, because there were few opportunities for employment, with the exception of coal mining, in our small hometown of Pax, West Virginia. Our parents always hoped their sons would never have to work in the coal mines, as did our father all his life to support his wife, four sons and two daughters.

Jack decided to join the Navy without discussing it with our parents, because our oldest brother had served in the Army in WWII, was wounded in combat and came home physically and emotionally scarred. Jack obviously did not wish to upset our parents. He quietly left home very early on the morning of April 18, 1950, and we never saw him again. After completing basic training in Great Lakes, IL, he was immediately assigned to U.S. Naval Air Station in Memphis, TN, with no leave time and upon completion of his training at Naval Air Technical Training Center on 12/22/50, he was coming home for Christmas! .....The next phone call informed us he was being transferred ASAP to Hawaii and would not make it home for the holidays. Christmas was never the same at our house.

Jack arrived in Hawaii on January 15, 1951, and was assigned to VP4 at Barbers Point. He was later transferred to VP6 and then sent to NAS Atsugi, Japan, for duty, arriving August 3, 1951. He had completed twenty missions between August 3 and November 6, 1951, when the plane on which he was a crewman, was shot down by two Soviet LA-11 fighters near Vladivostok, USSR. The mission was a top-secret, intelligence-gathering mission and this was a Cold War shoot down. All ten crewmen were declared missing. They were summarily declared presumed dead one year and one day later, November 7, 1952, according to policy at that time.

Jack is only one of many statistics to the U.S. Navy and our government. He is not merely a statistic to his family and I would like to share a few personal stories to put a human face to this statistic. He would now, as of April 25, 2004, be 73 years old. We have missed his laughter, his practical jokes, his letters to all of us individually as well as collectively, and always written with a wonderful sense of humor and caring. He never revealed details of his training, the missions he was assigned nor the danger he was in, because he would not want our mother to worry. Instead, he joked about how close to the water the plane flew sometimes...stating "they had to hold their feet up to keep from getting them wet!" He sent orchid corsages from Hawaii to arrive on Saturday, which our mother proudly wore to church on Sunday morning and always kept in a special cedar chest, even though they were totally disintegrated. Jack was not perfect, but he was certainly a caring and considerate son and brother. It is heartbreaking not to know what happened to him and his fellow crewmen. Our parents died in 1965 and 1967, at ages 59 and 60, still clinging to the hope that our government would find Jack and bring him home. I am sure they are with me in spirit as I endeavor to find his fate. I have no proof that he is alive; on the other hand, I have no proof that he is not. I would like to bring him home in any case.

If anyone reading this has knowledge of this shoot down or the fate of the ten crewmen, please contact me:
Patricia Lively Dickinson P.O. Box 503
Meadow Bridge, WV 25976 Ph/Fax: 304-484-7251