The Front Page

Newsletter of
Korea-Cold War Families of the Missing


May 2005 Issue #7

POW-MIA We Remember!

2005 FAMILY UPDATE LOCATIONS 2005
City selections are based on past update schedules and demographic mapping of family members' home locations.

2005 : July 30, 2005 Omaha , NE
August 27, 2005 Columbus , OH
September 24, 2005 San Diego , CA
October 26-28, 2005 Washington, DC*
November 19, 2005 Spokane , WA
* - The Korean and Cold War Annual Government Briefings




2005 National POW/MIA Recognition Day September 16, 2005




Family Update 2006 Cities (Dates To Be Announced)
Shreveport , LA • Savannah , GA • Oakland , CA • Louisville , KY • Syracuse , NY Minneapolis , MN • Seattle , WA • Washington , DC * Albuquerque , NM




Secretary's Corner by Emma Skuybida:
IMPORTANT NOTICE! Annual Membership ends December 2004. Please renew your membership as soon as possible. We rely on our members to support our ongoing efforts and our newsletter. Send your renewal and check today!

IF YOU HAVE ATTENDED ANY FAMILY OUTREACH IN 2005 BESIDES THE Washington DC, PLEASE CONTACT IRENE MANDRA AT imandra@optonline.net OR WRITE TO Korea/Cold War Families, PO Box 454, Farmingdale NY 11735.

If you wish to write a story about your missing loved one for the HEROES column in our newsletter, please do so and e-mail our web master at info@koreacoldwar.org If you have a picture, please include it.





IN MY OPINION
BY IRENE L. MANDRA


"Never apologize for showing feeling. When you do so, you apologize for the truth."
Benjamin Disraeli

My Dear Members,

The past several months have been a roller coaster of events, and emotions. In February, our Board of Directors published a No Confidence vote in DASD Jerry D. Jennings, head of DPMO and the USRJC. The National League of Families and the National Alliance of Families did the same.

It was a heartbreaking decision, one that we had no choice but to render. Clearly when the 3 major family organizations take the same stand, there is something terribly wrong that must be addressed and fixed. We are hoping that our actions, and those of our friends and fellow family members, will move those in power to make the right decisions. When I say the right decisions, I mean those that are in the best interest of the issue, of the family members, of those tasked with resolution and, most importantly, in the best interests of our missing loved ones.

TDuring February and March I gave sworn depositions to the IDA and the IG regarding the situation at DPMO, the USRJC, JCSD and DASD Jerry Jennings. The IDA is the Institute for Defense Analysis in Alexandria, VA. IDA is a nonprofit institution that provides independent assessments to U.S. Government Agencies and is currently undertaking a study on the USRJC and the JCSD. The Inspector General is collecting information and sworn statements regarding the current situation at DPMO and with DASD Jerry Jennings.

Rather than go into a lengthy explanation, I am enclosing the letter Korea-Cold War Families of the Missing sent to the Honorable Paul Wolfowitz, the Honorable Peter W. Rodman and, as a courtesy, the Honorable Jerry D. Jennings. The letter follows this In My Opinion and will address some of the issues and concerns that have brought us to this point.

Additionally, more confusion and disappointment are to be found with the Family Outreach schedule and the Annual Family Conference in Washington, D.C.

ONCE AGAIN, DPMO has changed our Annual Korea-Cold War Conference/Briefing and scheduled it for October 26th, 27th and 28th at the DoubleTree in Crystal City. This is the third date we have been given. Aside from the constant confusion of what, where and when, we now find that the DoubleTree is one of the more expensive hotels in the area. With the exceptionally high room rate and the local hospitality tax, accommodations will run nearly $200.00 a night for each room. When one considers transportation, food, lodging and whatever other expenses may occur, we are looking at a potential Conference cost of up to $1,000.00 per family member. This is outrageous. We are primarily Senior Citizens, most on fixed incomes and dependent on Social Security. In addition, many of us suffer from health and age-related conditions. It is a nightmare. We are presently looking for less expensive lodging and will notify everyone should we find a hotel that will work with us.

Please keep our POWs and MIAs in your Thoughts and Prayers.

Letter to Paul Wolfowitz follows:

The Honorable Paul Wolfowitz
Deputy Secretary of Defense
1010 Defense Pentagon
Washington, D.C.
20301-1010

Dear Doctor Wolfowitz,

On February 14th, 2005, Korea-Cold War Families of the Missing, a national organization serving the needs and interests of family members of POWs and MIAs from the Korean War and Cold War Era, recorded a Board of Directors vote of NO CONFIDENCE in DASD Jerry Jennings head of both DPMO and the US-Russian Joint Commission.

In addition, two other national family organizations, the National League of Families and the National Alliance of Families have also polled and recorded their Board of Directors to publish a NO CONFIDENCE vote in DASD Jennings. As you are aware, historically none of the family organizations can agree on anything. That we should all come to the same conclusion clearly shows that the POW-MIA issue in general and DPMO in particular is in shambles because of DASD Jerry Jennings.

I cannot express how difficult a measure this was for us. For years, for decades, we have done our level best to maintain faith and trust in our elected and appointed officials tasked with resolution of this painful issue. That we were forced to take a stand such as this is testimony to the horrible conditions at DPMO and the poor, if not outright hostile, manner in which DASD Jennings interacts with family members.

Let me list a few of the reasons that forced us to take such a vote;

1.) DASD Jennings is inaccessible to family members and representative organizations. He cannot be reached by phone, e-mail or mail.

2.) When addressed by correspondence, and asked to respond to a number of issues extremely important to us, the letter goes ignored for months. Finally, after we publicly stated that our letters went unanswered, DASD Jennings had one of his assistants, Mr. Adrian Cronauer, responded point by point, in what I can only describe as a most dismissive, almost scolding tone. After 3 months of waiting for a response, I was humiliated and disgusted that a public servant would use such a tone. In addition, answers to the questions were not always truthful or enlightening.

3.) DASD Jennings spends an inordinate amount of time insuring his name is in print and his travels duly recorded for the media. Unfortunately, we see nothing meaningful coming from all this drama. The perception amongst most is that it is simply spin or good PR and nothing of substance.

4.) DASD Jennings' management style has a negative effect of the North Koreans. This is an assessment that comes from those who are in the position to know and are concerned.

5.) DASD Jennings' management style has an extremely negative effect on DPMO personnel. As a result, there is a virtual mutiny at DPMO. The morale is nonexistent. There are numerous formal complaints, EEO complaints, the DASD filing counter complaints against those who dare to disagree with him... this is insanity.

Personnel are so wrapped up in the drama of what is occurring they are incapable of doing their job effectively. DASD Jennings is the lightning rod for most, if not all of the complaints. He has managed to distract and derail the mission and objectives. Personnel are reassigned, some are even prohibited from doing their jobs. They have openly stated to many family members that they are being prevented from doing their jobs, period. Presently there are sexual harassment complaints as well as hostile work environment charges against this man. In over 20 years publicly in this issue, I have never heard of such outrageousness. It is overshadowing the issue and the mission.

The grievances and complaints filtering out of DPMO only highlight the severe impact this man has had not only on personnel and the POW-MIA Office, but the perception of the public and our former adversaries with whom we are trying to gain trust and cooperation.

6.) The US-Russia Joint Commission needs a strong leader, who is respected and trusted ON BOTH SIDES. We already know how the good people at DPMO feel about him, I can only imagine what the Russians are thinking. I would like to point out the continued disruption of the US-Russian Joint Commission Plenum that has been canceled and rescheduled repeatedly. The Russians regard DASD Jennings as a low-level bureaucrat even though it is a Presidential Appointment. As DASD Jennings has managed to almost single-handedly destroy all vestiges of professionalism and the ability to do one's job effectively at DPMO, he is doing the same with the USRJC. In order to deal with Russia, we need a higher ranking appointee to the Commission for the US side. Previously we have had Generals and an Ambassador. The White House needs to be advised that it is imperative that respected, senior official be appointed to this sensitive position.

7.) DASD Jennings' proxy for the San Antonio, Texas, Family Outreach openly and publicly disparaged a family member in front of the entire gathering. This is inexcusable. Additionally, the proxy, Mr. Cronauer again, backpedalled when confronted by the family member. This is simply a replay of the antics family members were forced to endure 30 years ago. I sincerely thought we had managed to get past that dark period when family members were dismissed, demeaned and disrespected by officials, apparently I was wrong.

8.) DPMO appears to be trying to corral the entire issue and run it as the DASD sees fit. If it weren't for the family members, there would be no issue. The wives, husbands, mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, children and grandchildren have endured years, decades, of sacrifice, lies, and deception, being dismissed and disrespected by those vested with resolution. There are good people at DPMO and USRJC, but they and their efforts are being overshadowed by the ugliness that is permeating into their offices from a select few. There is an old saying that goes... "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." That DPMO and DASD Jennings would become the oversight agency of record over JPAC is mystifying.

As the representative of Korea-Cold War Families of the Missing, my members and I desperately hope that you will investigate the above outlined complaints and remedy the situation before it mortally wounds DPMO and the excellent people who bring dignity and compassion to an already impossible task... accounting for our loved ones and America's sons and daughters.

END OF LETTER





To Our Members From the Editor:
Please forgive us if you have received much of this information via e-mail or the internet. Unfortunately, the majority of our members are NOT online and have no way of being updated on the spectrum of news, drama and events that have occured over the past 4 months. Therefore, we find it necessary to publish a substantial amount of that material in this issue. We will try our best to get as much new 'news' in this issue as possible.




ANNOUNCEMENTS: Korea-Cold War Families of the Missing is Growing ! ! ! ! Thanks to your support, we have had a great many new members join our ranks. We welcome them and thank you all for your outstanding support.

Additionally, we have two new Board Members to help us with the massive amount of work that needs to be accomplished. Let us all welcome...

Research and Outreach - Debbe Petro, Family Member
Administrative Secretary at Central Michigan University in the College of Education and Human Services, Teacher Education Department, Mother, Korean War POW Niece.

Washington Liaison - Frank Metersky, Korean War Veteran
Fought at the Chosin Reservoir. Lifelong activist/veteran in the POW/MIA issue and was one of the veterans responsible for the recovery operation of remains in N. Korea.

Ms. Ki Ceniglio, Newsletter Editor, has been accepted to the UMBC Honors College in Maryland, and awarded TWO 4-year scholarships. She will double major in Physics/Math and Policy. This will be Ki's last newsletter for us as she leaves for her Freshman year at college in August. We will miss her desperately, but know she will do great things in the future. We wish her Godspeed and Good Luck!

Have no fear... the newsletter will be published uninterrupted. A volunteer graphic artist has agreed to handle the newsletter until a new Editor comes on board. So you may look forward to your newsletter every quarter without fail.






ON THE WEB:
http://users.snowcrest.net/jmike/coldwarmil.html
Korean and Cold War History Resources

http://wwics.si.edu/index.cfm?topic_id=1409&fuseaction=topics.home
Cold War International History Project





NEWS RELEASE from the United States
Department of Defense No. 304-05
IMMEDIATE RELEASE Mar 31, 2005


Cold War Missing In Action Aviator Identified :

The Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) has announced that the remains of the co-pilot of an aircraft shot down in China during the Cold War have been identified and will soon be returned to his family. He is Robert C. Snoddy of Roseburg, Ore.

Snoddy and his pilot, Norman A. Schwartz, took off from an airfield near Seoul, South Korea, on Nov. 29, 1952, with two other crewmembers to extract a CIA operative from China. The mission in the Jilin province of northeast China was planned to pick up the agent on the ground with an airborne extraction system. Unfortunately, the Chinese had compromised the agent on the ground, and when the C-47 aircraft flew over the pickup point it was shot down by hostile ground fire.

Snoddy and Schwartz were reportedly killed, and two other crewmembers, Richard G. Fecteau and John T. Downey, were captured by the Chinese and held until 1971 and 1973, respectively.




An Editorial on DPMO and The State of Affairs.
by Andi Wolos, AII POW-MIA

DPMO is broken.

The spirit, the comraderie, the morale, the ability to be effective in the issue called the "highest national priority" is shattered and needs to be replaced because it is irreparably beyond redemption under current conditions.

DPMO has become a battleground between family members and career bureaucrats, between military in uniform and civilians, between the powers-that-be and the personnel, between resolution, truth and answers, and stagnation, legerdemain and obfuscation.

There are outstanding people at DPMO, and JPAC and the USRJC. We applaud and embrace them for the job they do and the dignity and honor they try to bring to their jobs. They know who they are and so do we. We thank you.

However, some of these people are being punished for trying to do that job, that way. Some are even being prevented from doing their job. Some are simply being shelved, demoted, and demeaned. Yet, they try to accomplish what they believe they can do, what we as family members and the public has entrusted them to do, find answers, resolve cases, bring our loved ones home.

Unfortunately, these good people are fighting two enemies now ... externally our former adversaries who are at times belligerent and suspicious, and internally a new group of adversaries who are belligerent, suspicious and have the power to wreak havoc and create dissension and disgust amongst the ranks.

What was originally perceived by family members, veterans and caring citizens who live with the belief the POW-MIA issue IS of the highest national priority as misdirection and understaffing, is turning out to be a war within the walls at the Pentagon. Formal complaints are being filed, outside investigators are interviewing family members about the efficacy of the office, family organizations are voting No Confidence in DPMO's leadership and rather than address the problems head-on, senior Defense officials are passing the buck back to DPMO leadership.

It would appear senior Defense officials are loathe to 'officially' recognize that DPMO is screwed up. If they 'officially' become involved or acknowledge the seriousness of information in their possession, then they would HAVE TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT. They are not. They are listening to the noise, turning down the volume and patting the perpetrators, or is that perpeTRAITORS, on the back and telling them to go back and continue doing the fine job they have been doing.

Let's be brutally honest here. There's a war going on. People are being blown up. Troops are dying and being wounded. North Korea swears it has nukes. Russia thinks Bush fired Dan Rather. China, well, no one's really sure what China is up to. DoD has their plate full. DPMO is a 1.0 on the richter scale of DoD concerns. DoD also seems to view the escalating hostilities bewteen DPMO's leadership cadre and the families as nothing more than a public cat fight.

They couldn't be more wrong.

Note to DoD - get some better analysts to advise senior officials on the real reason behind the dissatisfaction and distress of the families.

We ARE NOT a group of frustrated, angry people who have nothing better to do with our lives than fight with DPMO leadership. Trust me, I would give anything NOT to be a family member of a POW or MIA. I would not wish 53 years of misery and not knowing on my worst enemy.

We HAVE put up with more nonsense, deceit and abuse over the years than anyone could imagine. Yet, we continue to have faith in our government. We have faith in our country and its military. We have faith in those who sit at the desks behind the door that says ...

"DPMO's VISION: The Promise Kept to those who serve in defense of this great nation to bring them home, honor their sacrifices and keep faith with their fellow warriors and families."

We ARE distressed because we have always had faith, yet the leadership has broken faith with us and our missing loved ones.

Now we find out that DPMO has become a battleground. The vision clouded by the smoke of so many fires burning. The mission detoured by the ongoing character and career assassinations. DPMO, under its current leadership, is so distracted and fractured by internal conflict it cannot see clearly anymore and its ability to be effective - and maintain its respectability on an international scale - is questionable at best.

If the senior Secretaries at DoD cannot, will not, do what must be done and put DPMO back on track and fix what is broken - trust, morale and direction - then Congressional Armed Services Hearings just might.





Announcement: The Board of Directors of Korea-Cold War Families of the Missing, on this day, have recorded a vote of NO CONFIDENCE in DASD Jerry Jennings as head of DPMO and Chairman of the USRJC. A letter stating this position is being prepared and will be forwarded to Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz and Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs Peter W. Rodman.




NEWS - U.S. team searches for MIAs in N. Korea
23 April, 2005
(UPI) A team of U.S. military and civilian specialists has begun a mission in North Korea to search for remains of soldiers missing in action in the country.

The Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office announced Wednesday the team of 27 entered the country April 16 for the 10th search mission in as many consecutive years, Stars and Stripes reported.




In Our Opinion
February - March, 2005
Irene Mandra
Korea-Cold War Families of the Missing
and Andi Wolos
AII POW-MIA

An Open Letter to Our Family Members, Supporters and Friends...

As you are aware, unrepatriated POWs and MIAs taken to the former Soviet Union have once again come into the news.

On February 11th, 2005, CNN broadcast a report featuring Mr. Norman Kass, from DPMO and the USRJC. In the report Norm states, "I personally would be comfortable saying that the number [of Americans held in the gulags during the Cold War and Korean War] is in the hundreds."

In addition, the fifth revision of The GULAG Study was released and an internal Pentagon report prepared.

This is just more confirmation of what we have known for decades; American servicemen from WW II, Korea, the Cold War Era and Southeast Asia were taken by the Soviets, transferred to camps, hospitals and the GULAG system, and never came home.

We are tired of the excuses and the 'may have', 'could be', 'possibly' and 'perhaps.' We know men WERE taken, held and never came home. Our government tells us this is so.

However, It is clear our government is incapable of resolving this issue, the issue of Russia and our POWs and MIAs. It is time we, as FAMILY MEMBERS took the bull by the horns and asked the RUSSIANS themselves for answers, access and closure.

I, as a family member, am not looking to point fingers, for punishment, revenge or justice. I simply want my beloved brother's remains home. If that is not possible, I simply ask for them to tell me, What Happened?

Somewhere someone knows. I, just like so many other family members, want to know, too. Is that too much to ask? My brother, like so many others, made the ultimate sacrifice. Our family, like so many others, gave a loved one to America, who then threw him away.

If my government is unable to find these men, their grave sites or answers, then I suggest every family member, every veteran, Ex-POW, and citizen ask the Russians to respond on a humanitarian level.

Mr. Putin, I will hold you blameless, just tell me the truth. That is all I want.

I will not hold the Russian Federation accountable in the World Court, or International Court or whatever they call it these days. I am not interested in law or anything else. I want closure, I want my brother. Our members want their husbands, fathers, cousins, brothers and grandfathers back.

I ask each and every one of you to write to the Russian Embassy and Consulate. Ask them to rise above it all and finally, simply, tell us where our loved ones are, open their archives and let the sun shine on the truth.

Tell them it is time to move forward. We have enormous problems we both must deal with such as terrorism, the economy, trade, a war. If we are to be partners in the future, we must resolve our differences from the past.

While you are at it, please take a moment to thank those good people who have always kept our POWs, MIAs and their families in the forefront of this fight... Mr. Norman Kass and Mr. Larry Greer and the good people who work with them and have with us all these years.

Thank you.




NEWS - Searching for Remains
23 April, 2005
U.S. Team Again Searching for Remains of MIAs in North Korea
Stars and Stripes - Pacific edition
SEOUL - For the 10th consecutive year, U.S. personnel are searching for the remains of U.S. troops missing in action in North Korea, the Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office announced Wednesday.

A 27-man team - composed of military and civilian specialists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii - entered the communist country April 16.

The team will focus on two areas: Unsan County, about 60 miles north of Pyongyang, and an area near the Chosin Reservoir, in the northeast.

U.S. troops battled Chinese units in Unsan County in November and December of 1950, and about 300 U.S. soldiers are believed to be missing, according Wednesdays news release. And more than 1,000 American troops were reported as missing in combat after fighting Chinese forces from November to December 1950 in the Chosin campaign.

Recovery teams in the field are led by a forensic anthropologist or archeologist and are supported by specialists in mortuary affairs, explosive ordnance disposal, medicine, vehicle maintenance and linguistics. Two U.S. personnel stay in Pyongyang to provide logistical and personnel support, according to the release.

The current mission will end in mid-May.

According to the release, teams have recovered more than 200 sets of remains since 1996; 20 were identified and returned to their families.

Visit the Web site of the Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office at www.dtic.mil/dpmo for more information.





Korea-Cold War Families Made Crazy by DPMO
10 March, 2005
Once again, DPMO has chosen to CHANGE the Korea-Cold War Annual Conference in Washington, DC. This is the THIRD date selected by DPMO and it has the families scrambling to adjust schedules and consider travel arrangements. Let's be honest here, most of these family members are aged and have to deal with a number of health and age-related issues. In the past, many have been unable to make certain monthly Family Outreaches, and DPMO has a firm policy against sending a surrogate or proxy. This is just more aggravation, expense and confusion.

To make matters worse, DPMO has now chosen the DoubleTree Hotel in Crystal City which has a nightly rate of almost $200.00 in conjunction with the exorbitant tax rate. When one factors in travel, food and accommodations each family member is looking at a cost of almost $1000.00 each. Considering the majority of family members are on Social Security, the Conference is cost-prohibitive for many.

DISGRACEFUL.

Is this poor planning on behalf of DPMO/DoD or is it revenge for the firm and very vocal stance Korea-Cold War family members have taken against DASD Jennings and the mess that DPMO has become?

For those wishing to attend, mark your calendars (in pencil);

OCTOBER 26, 27 and 28, 2005 - Korea-Cold War Annual Family Briefing
... somewhere around Washington, DC

Family members are presently looking for better rates on accommodations.




NEWS - Reservist Searches for American MIAs in North Korea
13 March, 2005
by Master Sgt. Bud McKay - 446th Airlift Wing
Public Affairs - AFRC News Service 2005-03-12

Master Sgt. Chris Rumley is about to leave for an extended camping trip March 13. He's not taking much with him.

When you go camping in North Korea, you tend to pack light.

Sergeant Rumley will be part of a 10-member U.S. team heading into Unsan County, North Korea, to search for the remains of missing American servicemen killed during the Korean War. He is a reservist and the program manager for Air Force Reserve Command's 446th Explosive Ordnance Disposal Flight.

"For me, I looked at this as being two, once-in-a-lifetime opportunities," Sergeant Rumley said. "The first is going into North Korea itself. The other is being on a team that actually looks for the remains of MIAs (missing in action). Bringing those people home for the families will make everything worthwhile."

According to Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, more than 78,000 Americans are still missing in action from World War II, 1,800 from the Vietnam War, 120 from the Cold War and one American from the Gulf War.

From the Korean War, more than 8,100 Americans remain unaccounted for. Of those, almost 400 Americans are missing from the Unsan County region.

Sergeant Rumley's primary job will be to identify and clear, if needed, any ordnance the teams of Army Special Forces medics, anthropologists, Navy Seabees and vehicle maintainers come across. But he'll also be expected to help look for remains.

"What I've been told is we're basically doing a battlefield sweep of the area, which could also include a POW camp," Sergeant Rumley said. "They haven't told us yet what I'll be looking for as far as EOD work, but I expect to find grenades and mines. I have studied different types of ordnance used during that war, and there are some nasty ones."

The nasty ones, according to Sergeant Rumley, include unexploded bazooka rounds that have fuses designed to detonate in a variety of ways. Just rolling them over could trigger an explosion, Sergeant Rumley said.

"Those things are what, 50-60 years old now?" he said. "Who knows what they could do."

Even though McChord has nearly every tool in the inventory for EOD, Sergeant Rumley won't be taking any of his military tools or uniforms with him into North Korea. He'll get whatever he needs from JPAC at Hickam AFB, Hawaii.

"Everything we take with us will be civilian, from the backpacks and clothes to the tools and equipment," Sergeant Rumley said. "The EOD equipment is basically the same as we have here (at McChord). It's just not (olive-drab)-green. But we're not really taking that much. We have to be pretty mobile, so I imagine we'll take a magnetometer and some pin markers; and I expect to use small garden tools also."

The search team will live under primitive conditions. The only food the members of the team will have is the food they carry in with them.

The team will stay in tents near possible recovery sites. Along with the 10 Americans, Sergeant Rumley said nearly 100 North Koreans will be hired to take care of a lot of the manual labor.

Negotiations in Bangkok, Thailand, in November, led by the Department of Defense Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office, set five joint-field activities in the North Korea for 2005. Additionally, the year's activity will include one pre-investigative period and one period of joint advance work.

Sergeant Rumley leaves March 13 for training at Hickam AFB, Hawaii, and should head into North Korea in mid-April. If all goes as scheduled, he should return to McChord in early June.

"I'm excited and apprehensive about being a military member and going into North Korea," he said. "My wife (Master Sgt. Stephanie Rumley, 446th Mission Support Group) is very supportive of me going. I'll be alright once I get going. But walking in and out of the demilitarized zone is going be something else ? especially if we're able to bring some missing servicemembers home." 2000-2004, eMilitary, Inc.




NEWS - U.S. & North to Meet Over War Remains
05 March, 2005
World News Connection
ROK Daily: U.S. and North to Meet Over War Remains
March 04, 2005 - The United States and North Korea are scheduled to hold a meeting today at the truce village of Panmunjeom [P'anmunjo'm] to prepare for the resumption of efforts to recover more remains of U.S. soldiers who died in the Korean War. The U.S. operation is to began in April. In an interview with Radio Free Asia, Larry Greer, spokesman for the U.S. Department of Defense for the Joint POW-MIA Accounting Command, said the joint recovery operations will take place from next month until October in the North's South Hamgyeong and North Pyeongan provinces. Ten separate recovery operations are scheduled to take place, Mr. Greer said. The United States began recovery efforts in North Korea in 1996. This year the United States is to pay North Korea $5 million in return for continuing this year's work to find missing Americans.




GULAG Study 5th Edition is AVAILABLE
15 February, 2005

http://aiipowmia.com/gulag/gulag5feb2005.pdf NOTE: This is a PDF file, is 14.4 megs and requires a PDF Reader such as Adobe Acrobat or Preview.

For those who wish to read the previous 4 versions, please go to:
http://www.aiipowmia.com/gulag/gulagstart.html and scroll down to the bottom. They are available in .html format.




ON THE WEB:
Documents Relating to the Cold War
http://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/coldwar.htm




Russia, POWs, MIAs and Resolution
13 February, 2005

It is time we all started working together...

"An Open Letter to Our Family Members, Supporters and Friends...

As you are aware, unrepatriated POWs and MIAs taken to the former Soviet Union have once again come into the news.

On February 11th, 2005, CNN broadcast a report featuring Mr. Norman Kass, from DPMO and the USRJC. In the report Norm states, "I personally would be comfortable saying that the number [of Americans held in the gulags during the Cold War and Korean War] is in the hundreds."

In addition, the fifth revision of The GULAG Study was released and an internal Pentagon report prepared.

This is just more confirmation of what we have known for decades; American servicemen from WW II, Korea, the Cold War Era and Southeast Asia were taken by the Soviets, transferred to camps, hospitals and the GULAG system, and never came home.

We are tired of the excuses and the 'may have', 'could be', 'possibly' and 'perhaps.' We know men WERE taken, held and never came home. Our government tells us this is so.

However, It is clear our government is incapable of resolving this issue, the issue of Russia and our POWs and MIAs. It is time we, as FAMILY MEMBERS and caring citizens take the bull by the horns and ask the RUSSIANS themselves for answers, access and closure.

I, as a family member, am not looking to point fingers, for punishment, revenge or justice. I simply want my beloved brother's remains home. If that is not possible, I simply ask for them to tell me, What Happened?

Somewhere someone knows. I, just like so many other family members, want to know, too. Is that too much to ask? My brother, like so many others, made the ultimate sacrifice. Our family, like so many others, gave a loved one to America, who then threw him away.

If my government is unable to find these men, their grave sites or answers, then I suggest every family member, every veteran, Ex-POW, and citizen ask the Russians to respond on a humanitarian level.

Mr. Putin, I will hold you blameless, just tell me the truth. That is all I want.

I will not hold the Russian Federation accountable in the World Court, or International Court or whatever they call it these days. I am not interested in law or anything else. I want closure, I want my brother. Our members want their husbands, fathers, cousins, brothers and grandfathers back.

I ask each and every one of you to write to the Russian Embassy and Consulate. Ask them to rise above it all and finally, simply, tell us where our loved ones are, open their archives and let the sun shine on the truth.

Tell them it is time to move forward. We have enormous problems we both must deal with such as terrorism, the economy, trade, a war. If we are to be partners in the future, we must resolve our differences from the past.

While you are at it, please take a moment to thank those good people who have always kept our POWs, MIAs and their families in the forefront of this fight... Mr. Norman Kass and Mr. Larry Greer and the good people who work with them and have with us all these years.

Thank you,
Irene Mandra
Korea-Cold War Families of the Missing
Sister, USMC SGT Philip V. Mandra MIA Bronco Hill Korea 07 August 1952
and
Andi Wolos
President & Director, AII POW-MIA

Write Messrs. Kass and Greer at

Department of Defense,
Defense Prisoner Of War/Missing Personnel Office
2400 Defense Pentagon, Washington, DC 20301-2400

Write the Russians at

Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the United Nations
136 East 67 Street, New York, N.Y. 10021
212-861-4900; 861-4901; 861-4902
Fax: 212-628-0252

Rossijskaja Federacija
Embassy of the Russian Federation
2650 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Washington, DC, 20007
202-298-5700
Fax: 202-298-5735

The Consular Division of the Embassy
of the Russian Federation in Washington, D.C.
2641 Tunlaw Road, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20007
202-939-8907, 939-8913, 939-8918
Fax:202-483-7579
Head of the Consular Division: Vadim V. Saveliev




Remembering Our Warriors
Memorial Day is meant for them
So let us not forget
To spend some time to honor those
Who died with no regret!

Weve all been touched by wars
Thats why we have this day
Its to honor fallen heroes
And thank them our own way.

And as we search to find
Those certain ones we love
We often feel a gentle peace
That comes from up above.

And when our journey stops
We bow and say a prayer
And stare down at the cross or stone
And read the name with care.

We spend some time in silence
And our eyes cloud with a tear
As we hold on to the moment
Like we do each passing year.

And as we say, good-bye!
Before we walk away
We promise to remember them
Beyond this special day!

By, Bob Beskar 4-4-2005
Vietnam War Veteran





NEWS - U.S. Plans Expanded MIA Project with North Korea
16 February, 2005
By Carol Giacomo, Diplomatic Correspondent
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Despite rising tensions over North Korea's nuclear program, the United States will soon begin an expanded mission to recover remains of Americans missing from the Korean War, a Pentagon official said on Tuesday.

The direct cooperation between Washington and Pyongyang in the project, which has been going on since 1996, stands in marked contrast to the Bush administration's refusal to engage the North bilaterally and its efforts to cut off flows of hard currency that underpin the communist government. The latest, expanded recovery project will pay Pyongyang $5 million this year.





NEWS - Russia Downed US Jet In Korean War
26 February, 2005
(AP) Closing a curious chapter of Korean War history, the Pentagon announced Friday it had identified the remains of an Air Force pilot whose jet crashed on Chinese territory after being shot down during a dogfight with a Russian flying for North Korea.

The case puts a spotlight on a Russian role in the 1950-53 Korean War that was kept quiet for decades and helped feed speculation inside the American government that the Russians had attempted and perhaps managed to capture U.S. pilots to exploit them for intelligence purposes.





U.S. Department of Defense
Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense
(Public Affairs) News Release No. 196-05

IMMEDIATE RELEASE February 24, 2005

U.S. Seeks Continued Chinese Cooperation on POW/MIA Issue

A senior DoD delegation has concluded talks in China about additional cooperation on POW and MIA cases.

Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for POW/Missing Personnel Affairs Jerry D. Jennings led a delegation to China this week to explore opportunities with Chinese officials. His two days of talks included discussions with officials from the Chinese government's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Ministry of National Defense. Additionally, the delegation met with officials of the Chinese Red Cross to discuss matters relating to the POW camps which the Chinese managed during the Korean War.

The Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office has policy oversight of the U.S. government's mission to bring home Americans missing in action from all conflicts. Some 88,000 are still missing from the Vietnam War, the Cold War, the Korean War, World War II and Desert Storm.

"The people and government of China have provided us assistance over the years in resolving Vietnam War cases, as well as those from World War II. And, most recently, it was through their cooperation that we recovered the remains of an American pilot missing in action from the Korean War," Jennings said.

He added, "But there's much more work to be done, and I'm confident the discussions just concluded will move us forward on several cases."

During the discussions with Chinese officials, Jennings continued to explore options for reviewing documents related to the POW camps where Americans were held during the Korean War. He also thanked officials for Chinese support for investigations and remains recovery operations in 2004.

Following his talks in Beijing, he is scheduled to travel to Dandong, China, to thank local officials for their help in a recent Korean War era remains recovery.





Official - Americans in GULAGs 11 February, 2005
Official says hundreds of U.S. citizens likely died in gulags

A document from Russian archives lists American servicemen in Soviet custody in May 1945.

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- U.S. military service members may have been imprisoned and died in Soviet forced-labor camps during the 20th century, according to a Pentagon report to be released Friday.

Researchers for the U.S.-Russia Joint Commission on POW/MIAs have been investigating unconfirmed reports of Americans who were held prisoner in the so-called gulags. "I personally would be comfortable saying that the number [of Americans held in the gulags during the Cold War and Korean War] is in the hundreds," said Norman Kass, executive secretary of the commission's U.S. section.





Remember, growing older is mandatory
Growing up is optional
We make a living by what we get
We make a life by what we give

Author Unknown




NEWS - Russian Help Needed in Finding Servicemen
ROBERT BURNS - Associated Press February 2005
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon is turning up the heat on the Russian government for ignoring pleas to cooperate in verifying an expanding body of anecdotal evidence that American servicemen from World War II and the Korean War were secretly held in prison camps in Siberia.

Russian inaction has made the effort to confirm information about the presence of Americans in the gulag - the network of penal camps that stretched across the former Soviet Union - "a distinctly unilateral U.S. pursuit," Norman Kass, a leader of the Pentagon project, wrote in the introduction to a new compendium of reported sightings of Americans in the camps.

"Americans, including American servicemen, were imprisoned in the former Soviet Union," the report says. But no "definitive, verifiable information" of their fate has been found.

The report, released Friday by the Defense POW/MIA Office, includes a reference to a Polish citizen who grew up in a village near the Russian city of Bulun, on the Lena River, and who said that her father had known an American named Stanley Warner while both were imprisoned at Bulun in the 1950s.

Among the American servicemen listed as missing from World War II is a Stanley L. Warner, a Navy reservist from Michigan. This possible connection is one of the cases being pursued.

Kass says efforts to gain wider access for U.S. investigators to former Soviet security and military intelligence officers with possible knowledge of foreigners in the gulag have stalled. And he sees no indication that the Russians are warming to the idea.

"In fact it's fair to say there's been largely a position of non-pursuit" by the Russians, he said in an interview.

The Russian government has been deeply skeptical of the evidence available so far - mainly eyewitness and secondhand oral and written accounts with limited details and little or no documentation.





Speaking the Truth
13 February, 2005
Editorial by Andi Wolos, AII POW-MIA ::

After all these years of being battered by apologists for the USG over the transfer of American military personnel to the former Soviet Union, we learn "Americans, including American servicemen, were imprisoned in the former Soviet Union," an official 2005 USG report says.

There is no satisfaction that all the previous reports and sightings were correct, that family members who schleppt to the oblasts and outbacks of Siberia and beyond were correct, that former GULAG prisoners and military officials who claimed contact with Americans were correct.

For decades we have said that Americans were transferred, suffered and eventually died there. And for years we have been called nuts, cranks, disillusioned, disenfranchised, scam artists, and worse. So many have faced personal chastisement and professional mortality in the process. Researchers, journalists, government officials... dragged into the court of public opinion, fueled by a neverending barrage of denials from official sources, tried and executed in the media.

For those who have a short attention span or just climbed onto the issue bandwagon, this admission is earth-shattering news. For the families who have waited 60, 50 and 30 years, for the advocates who have been around for 30 or more years, this is just one more piece of evidence and confirmation of what has been known since the first shots were fired in anger and the first man went missing.

US POWs were taken to the former Soviet Union and never repatriated. Period.

These are not new words or those that no one has ever spoken. They are, almost verbatim, words written 12 years ago in another USG report. A report that fueled enormous strum und drang in wives, children, siblings and others who wait the endless wait.

Its opening words were, "Executive Summary: "US Korean War POWs were transferred to the Soviet Union and never repatriated." Peter Tsouras, The Transfer of US POWs to the Soviet Union, Joint Commission Support Branch, Research & Analysis Division, DPMO, 26 Aug 1993"

The impact was so great, and so detrimental to the new perestroika that was overcoming the great red bear, that the report was held back, rewritten and rephrased to soften its impact before it was released. Fortunately some intrepid soul in a higher governmental orbit had the presence of mind to retain an original copy and insure it got into our hands for public dissemination before it was 'edited'.

Let us look at some other statements of fact in USG reports:

On WW II : "An undetermined number of American POWs liberated by Soviet forces during World War II from Nazi Germany POW camps, were NOT repatriated to the United Sates or otherwise accounted for by Soviet Authorities." Dr. Paul M. Cole, POW-MIA Issues, Vol. 1, 2 & 3 National Defense Research Institute, Rand, 1994

"Information from the Soviet archives indicates that Soviet authorities deliberately misled US officials concerning the fate of American POWs." Rand, 1994

On the Cold War Era : "This report presents documentation of the United States Government's conclusion that some of these crew men were captured alive by Soviet forces but not repatriated." Rand, 1994

"Foremost among the major findings in this report is the conclusion that direct evidence suggests that American servicemen were transferred to the territory of the USSR from the Korean War zone of combat operations." Rand, 1994

Executive Summary: "US Korean War POWs were transferred to the Soviet Union and never repatriated." Peter Tsouras, The Transfer of US POWs to the Soviet Union, Joint Commission Support Branch, Research & Analysis Division, DPMO, 26 Aug 1993

On the Vietnam War : "The intelligence indicates that the American Prisoners of War have been held continuously after Operation Homecoming and remain in captivity in Vietnam and Laos as late as 1989." Oral Intelligence Briefing before the Senate Select Committee on POWs-MIAs, April 8, 1992

"Despite adherences to internal policies and public statements after April, 1973, that "no evidence" existed of living POWs, DIA authoritatively concluded as late as April, 1974, that several hundred living POW/MIAs were still held captive in Southeast Asia." Interim Report on the Southeast Asian POW/MIA Issue By the US Senate Committee on Foreign Relations Republican Staff Release Date: Monday, October 29, 1990

"In fact, classified and unclassified information all confirm one startling fact: That DOD in April, 1974, concluded beyond a doubt that several hundred living American POWs remained in captivity in Southeast Asia. This was a full year after DOD spokesmen were saying publicly that no prisoners remained alive." Interim Report on the Southeast Asian POW/MIA Issue By the US Senate Committee on Foreign Relations Republican Staff Release Date: Monday, October 29, 1990

There have been hundreds, thousands, of other references and discussions by some very impressive authors with substantial backgrounds. However, the statements above are important because they are from official reports, not personal opinion in a privately published report, document, or book.

All state, without equivocation, that Russia (and others) are to blame and have the answers, which they are not sharing. It is Russia, and others, who were our enemy, then our adversary and now our partners on the international stage.

Yet, we are the ones treated as the enemy.

News Break - We are not the enemy.

We are the ones who bear the burden of not knowing and the brunt of attacks by those vested with the responsibility of finding answers and resolution.

Why? We are an easy target. We are mothers, fathers, wives, children, sisters, brothers, grandchildren, disabled vets and citizens who simply care. We go to work, pay our taxes, vote and write letters. We have no nukes, no vote in the UN. And we are dismissed, our claims considered madness and we are the ones who are disparaged in back-channel discussions, meetings and correspondence. (Hello Mr. Jennings.)

WE DO NOT HAVE THE POWs and MIAs. Why are we on the receiving end of such abuse? THE RUSSIANS, NORTH KOREANS and OTHERS have our POWs and MIAs, yet they are coddled and cowtowed to.

The problem here is time and human nature. They are our enemies now. Our former adversaries are loathe to be honest and open about the issue of Americans in Soviet Bloc custody. Regardless of how many reports we author, how many plenums we attend, how many archives we sift through, the unwillingness of Russia, and others, to own up to their actions and answer questions honestly and forthrightly is disgraceful.

That our elected, appointed and disappointing officials and public servants allow this to continue and punish family members, veterans, advocates and activists is despicable.

That there are a few good men and women who will speak out and let the world know the truth, we are grateful.





NEWS - China Asked About KW POWs
25 February, 2005
US holds talks on MIA issues with China

WASHINGTON : A US Defense Department delegation is seeking Chinese help in accounting for US servicemembers held in Chinese prisoner of war camps during the Korean War, the Pentagon said.

The Pentagon's chief of POW/MIA affairs, Jerry Jennings, held two days of talks on missing in action cases in Beijing with Chinese foreign ministry and defense officials.

"During the discussions with Chinese officials, Jennings continued to explore options for reviewing documents related to the POW camps where Americans were held during the Korean War," a Pentagon statement said.





NEWS - 542 South Korean POWs Alive in North
16 February, 2005
(UPI) A total of 542 South Korean prisoners of war are believed to be alive in North Korea more than 50 years after their capture, Seoul's defense chief said Monday.

At the end of 2004 the number of South Korean POWs was estimated to be 1,523, of whom 542 were still alive in the communist nation, Defense Minister Yoon Kwang-ung told Parliament.





NEWS - Film About Missing Korean War Soldier Wins Top Prize
By ROBERT A. HAMILTON
Day Staff Writer, Navy/Defense/Electric Boat
5/1/2005
A film about a Plainfield man missing in action since the Korean War has won first prize in the documentary category at the Fort Myers Film Festival in Florida.

Missing, Presumed Dead, produced by Bill Dumas, a nephew of the missing soldier, and which examines the issue of whether prisoners of war might have been abandoned at the end of the war, was one of 200 documentaries that were screened, said Janeen Paulauskis, the festival's executive director.





NEWS - US military continues work to recover Korean War dead
A United States military team has started work in North Korea for the 10th consecutive year to recover remains of US service members missing in action from the Korean War.